Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Deleting a student



Agencies can delete students themselves unless the student has a FY Record from a previous fiscal year.  If they try to delete a student who has a FY Record from a previous fiscal year, they will get a message that the student cannot be deleted.  They can then contact us in tech support so we can review the FY Records for the student in question.  

If the student they want to delete was not  reportable in a previous fiscal year, we will delete the FY Record so they can then delete the student.  If the student was reportable in a previous fiscal year, the FY Record cannot be deleted because this will change the numbers on the NRS reports for that fiscal year, which can cause issues for the state office during an audit.  The FY Records are not transferrable from one student record to another.

In the case of the specific students mentioned, they may first want to double-check to be absolutely the two students are not truly different students:

So, these may actually be two different students.  There is no SSN listed, so I can't use that for additional comparison.

BUT, even if they truly are the same student, neither record will be able to be deleted.

This means both student records will need to remain in the database.  What I typically recommend in this scenario is that the agency decide which record they no longer want to use for data entry and update the last name for this student to something like 'TLAST NAME DO NOT USE.'  That way the student record will remain in the database for historical reporting purposes, but they will not accidentally put new data in that record.

Monday, October 28, 2013

NMHED Adult Basic Education ENROLLMENT, INTAKE,



NMHED Adult Basic Education ENROLLMENT, INTAKE,

AND GOAL-SETTING PROCEDURES
 
 
 
 
SECTION I: INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT
 
This policy is intended to provide programs with guidance on intake, enrollment and goal-setting procedures. A standardized process is required to ensure that programs are consistent in collecting and maintaining accurate information. It is necessary for local ABE programs to reliably report high-quality data to the State Adult Basic Education Division for analysis, trending and required reporting to the NRS, various agency officials and legislative representatives.
 
 
 
 
SECTION II: GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
 
 
 
The National Reporting System (NRS) Implementation Guidelines require States to use a standardized process (and forms) to collect student data and information for annual reporting. The State Adult Education Division requires local ABE programs to have in place standardized methods for student enrollment, intake, and goal-setting.
 
All students must be provided written copies of their rights under FERPA, including their rights to confidentiality of educational records, rights to access and/or correct educational records, and students’ rights to file a complaint/grievance (due process). Students must be provided copies of the written grievance procedure including information about how to file a complaint with the State ABE Division office, and this information must be posted in every ABE classroom (in both English and Spanish). Student requests for translations of forms and orientation materials, including requests for alternate formats (e.g., braille) must be made available to the students upon request.
 
 
 
 
Enrollment
 
 
 
 
Enrollment is a student participation measure that captures the type of participation selected by the student. Local ABE programs may offer open or managed enrollment models. There are advantages and disadvantages to the open or managed enrollment models, which can vary from providing schedules that accommodate working students (open model) to increasing the number of students who attend at least 12 hours (managed enrollment). The local ABE programs are expected to periodically review their program performance to determine which model is most effective for student outcomes.
 
The enrollment types are:
 
Adult Basic Education Program—A program of instruction designed for adults who lack competence in reading, writing, speaking, problem solving, or computation at a level necessary to function in society, on a job, or in the family.

Adult Secondary Education Program—A program of instruction designed for adults who have some literacy skills and can function in everyday life but who are not proficient or do not have a certificate of graduation or its equivalent from a secondary school.
 
 EL Program—A program of instruction designed to help adults with limited English proficiency achieve competence in the English language.

Correctional Education Program—A program of ABE, ASE, or EL instruction for adult criminal offenders in correctional institutions.

Correctional Facilities—Any prison, jail reformatory, work farm, detention center, or any other Federal, State, or local institution designed for the confinement or rehabilitation of criminal offenders.

Community Corrections Programs—A community-based rehabilitation facility or halfway house.

Family Literacy Program—A program with a literacy component for parents and children or other intergenerational literacy components.

Workplace Literacy ProgramA program designed to improve the productivity of the workforce through improvement of literacy skills needed in the workplace by:
  • Providing adult literacy and other basic skill services and activities, including basic computer literacy skills.
  • Providing adult secondary education services and activities that may lead to the completion of a high school diploma or its equivalent.
  • Meeting the literacy needs of adults with limited English proficiency.

Program for the Homeless—A program designed for homeless adults. Homeless adults lack a fixed, regular, nighttime residence or have a residence that is (1) a publicly supervised or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations (including welfare hotels, congregate shelters, and transitional housing for the mentally ill), (2) an institution that provides temporary residence for individuals intended to be institutionalized, or (3) a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings. The term homeless adult does not apply to any individual imprisoned or otherwise detained pursuant to an act of the Congress or a State law.

Other Institutional Programs—Any other medical or special institution.

Distance Education—Formal learning activity where students and instructors are separated by geography, time or both for the majority of the instructional period. Distance learning materials are delivered through a variety of media including, but not limited to, print, audio recording, videotape, broadcasts, computer software, web-based programs and other online technology. Teachers support distance learners through communication via mail, telephone, e-mail or online technologies and software.

Intake
 
 
When students enter a program, the intake process must collect important information to include in annual reports. This includes demographic information, such as, age, ethnicity, race, gender, employment status, public assistance status and student goals. Programs should use standardized forms for data collection to limit data-entry errors and help ensure data quality. At the State level, program data is aggregated to measure progress against state performance standards.
 
The intake process includes student orientation which describes the services offered, counseling students on program expectations, conducting assessments of the educational functional levels of students in order to determine initial educational placement, and goal-setting.
 
Local ABE programs are expected to train all staff involved in the intake process. All tasks, procedures, and responsibilities must be clearly documented to help ensure accurate data collection and reporting in the statewide data system (LACES).
 
Local ABE programs must provide students with written information about their rights under FERPA in intake/orientation, including their rights to confidentiality of educational records, rights to access and/or correct educational records, and students’ rights to file a complaint/grievance (due process). Local ABE programs must provide students a copy of the local ABE grievance procedures in writing and in a format that allows students to benefit (e.g., in a native language or alternate format) from the information. Local ABE programs must make all program materials available in Spanish and English (e.g. intake and orientation forms).
 
 
 
 
Goal-Setting
 
 
 
 
Although the NRS has now developed a process which automatically places students into cohorts, the State Adult Education Division still requires local ABE programs to collect information related to student goals. The Performance-based funding formula is partially based on the degree to which students achieve the goals that they set.
 
Local ABE programs must help students establish goals based on assessment results,
 
Student’s personal and professional interests, and other factors, such as student work schedule, family responsibilities and other issues. Classroom instruction will better meet student needs and expectations, become more meaningful, help improve attendance, aid retention and enhance program success if there are opportunities for periodic review of goals in ways that support student goal achievement. Local ABE programs must advise students about goals as they relate to the requirements associated with adult education level gains, progress in English language learning activities, citizenship, employment, postsecondary education and training. Local ABE programs must ensure that students are informed about their rights to have access to and review their records, assessment results, and any educational files, notes or information related to their participation in the program. Student records must be updated on a timely basis (at least monthly).
 
SECTION III: FOLLOW-UP
 
Local ABE programs must explain the follow-up process to students in orientation. Follow-up activities can be conducted according to the student’s preferred method of contact (phone call, email, mail or personal contact), but local ABE programs may use other contact methods if the preferred method is ineffective.
 
To comply with National Reporting System (NRS) requirements, State performance in Adult Basic Education is based on several indicators of student achievement. These
 
 
core outcome measures are:

1. Obtain a job
 
2. Retain current job
 
3. Earn a GED
 
4. Enter post-secondary education or training
 
5. Advance in educational level
 
The NRS has identified several optional, secondary outcome measures that students may want to select as secondary goals (please refer to
 
 
Implementation Guidelines for further information:

Achieved work-based project learning goal

Reduced or left public assistance

Achieved citizenship skills

Voted or registered to vote

Increased involvement in community activities

Increased involvement in children’s education

Increased involvement in children’s literacy activities

Even though States are not required to collect and report on these optional outcome measures, students may find them to be an important part of their educational effort.
 
Achievement status on these goals is reported annually on Table 11.
 
 

NMHED Local ABE Program Data Management Procedures FY 2013-14



NEW MEXICO HIGHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

NMHED Adult Basic Education Division Data Management Procedures


SECTION I: INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT


This policy is intended to provide programs with guidance on intake, enrollment and goal-setting procedures. A standardized process is required to ensure that programs are consistent in collecting and maintaining accurate information. It is necessary for local ABE programs to reliably report high-quality data to the State Adult Basic Education Division for analysis, trending and required reporting to the NRS, various agency officials and legislative representatives.


SECTION II: GENERAL REQUIREMENTS


A. Data Collection


The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA, WIA, Title II, Section 212), via the NRS Implementation Guidelines, and the New Mexico State Plan require the use of a standardized process (and forms) to collect student data and information for annual reporting. This data collection includes student demographics, assessment, attendance, goal-setting, pre-and post-testing among others.

Data technicians are required to be trained on the NRS system as well as the LACES database. Certifications must be readily available to present to the State Office Site Visit Review Team. Local ABE programs must enter data into LACES on a timely basis (at least monthly).

WIA (Section 212, A) and the New Mexico State Plan require the collection of program information related to the core indictors of performance in order to analyze program performance:

"(i) Demonstrated improvements in literacy skill levels in reading, writing, and speaking the English language, numeracy, problem solving, English language acquisition, and other literacy skills.

(ii) Placement in, retention in, or completion of, postsecondary education, training, unsubsidized employment or career advancement.

(iii) Receipt of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent."

Goal-Setting

Although the NRS has now developed a process which automatically places students into cohorts, the State Adult Basic Education Division still requires local ABE programs to collect information related to student goals (please see

State policy on Enrollment, Intake and Goal-setting). The performance-based funding formula is partially based on the degree to which students achieve the goals that they set.

Local ABE programs must help students establish goals based on assessment results,

Student’s personal and professional interests, and other factors, such as student work schedule, family responsibilities and other issues. Classroom instruction will better meet student needs and expectations, become more meaningful, help improve attendance, aid retention and enhance program success if there are opportunities for periodic review of goals in ways that support student goal achievement. Local ABE programs must advise students about goals as they relate to the requirements associated with adult education level gains, progress in English language learning activities, citizenship, employment, postsecondary education and training.


Follow-up Process



To comply with National Reporting System (NRS) requirements, State performance in Adult Basic Education is based on several indicators of student achievement (
See NRS Implementation Guidelines). These core outcome measures are: Topic
Measures

Definitions

Educational Gains

Pre- and Post-testing for Educational Level Gains

Improvements in educational
functioning levels in reading, writing, speaking and listening and functional
areas


Follow-up Measures

Entered employment
Retained employment (Includes Improved Employment)
Receipt of secondary school diploma or GED
Placement in postsecondary education or training


Learners who obtain a job by the first quarter after exit quarter
Learners who entered employment who are employed in the third quarter after program exit
Learners who obtain a
GED, secondary school diploma or recognized equivalent
Learners who enroll in a
postsecondary educational or
occupational skills program building on prior services or training received


Friday, October 25, 2013

Who is in the Enter Employment Cohort?


The 13/14 Table 5 for Enter Employment includes students who left between 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013.  The following link from the NRS has additional information about when students are included on Table 5 for the Employment outcomes based on when they left the program:  http://www.nrsweb.org/Tips/EmploymentReporting/NRSTips_Employment_Reporting.pdf   


What Students to follow-up on?


I would use the All Followup Outcomes tab to find the students who need to be data matched.  If the students meet the requirements for being included on Table 5, a cohort record will have been created for them and will be in the All Followup Outcomes tab (accessed by clicking the little double arrows at the bottom of the left navigation pane).

 

Once you are in the All Followup Outcomes tab, you can click the + next to Outcome in the left Navigation Pane and then select Enter Employment, so you are only left with the Enter Employment cohort and goal records.

 

Then, if you are currently only interested in data matching the students who left between 4/1/13 - 6/30/13 (to check employment status between 7/1/12 - 9/30/13), then you can limit the selection to only those students who left in this time period using a General Search I created.  Go to Find > General Search and click Use Existing Query.  In the dropdown menu, choose 'left date 4/1/13 - 6/30/13' and then click query IN SELECTION (so you are only searching the Enter Employment records).

 

This will leave you with all of the students who are in the Cohort and left in the specified time period (2591 in the SEA database).

 

From here, you can choose to data match all of these students, but you may want to exclude any students who are already marked as achieving the outcome and who also have responded to survey checked.  To do this, I would export the data to Excel (Print > Export) and in Excel, sort first by Outcome Status and then by Responded to Survey.  You can then delete anyone who is marked as YES on both.

 

You may also want to exclude from the data match people who are marked as having met the outcome even if Responded to survey is currently marked as No.  If that is the case, you might want to contact the agencies who have students indicated as achieving the outcome but not responding to survey to let them know they will need to mark responded to survey in order for it to count as Met on Table 5.

 

I am not sure in SD if there is a fee for you to do the data match.  If there isn't, I would start with the largest selection of students which is just everyone who is in the cohort and left in the relevant time period.  But, if there is a fee, you may want to go those extra steps to omit the people who have already been marked as achieving the outcome.

 

Keep in mind that the All Followup Outcomes tab is processing lots and lots of data so it is a little slow to work in it, but it will definitely give you the info you need on students who need to be data matched.

Primary Program


Distance Education - based on having 51+% of hours in the fiscal year with the Type 'Instruction-Distance Learning.'  This triggers inclusion on 4C and 5A if the student meets NRS reporting requirements.

Family Literacy - the Primary Program Family Literacy triggers inclusion on Tables 6 and 8

Workplace Literacy - the Primary Program Workplace Literacy triggers inclusion on Tables 6 and 9

Work-based Project Learner - the Primary Program Work-based Project Learner triggers inclusion on Tables 6 and 12

Corrections - triggered by either Primary Program of Corrections or the dropdown for Correctional on the Demographics screen.  There is information detailing this in the LACES 2012.1.0 Release Notes when we made some updates to this.

The following rules apply to how Corrections students are displayed on Table 6:

  • When a student’s primary program is Corrections (Option Code 500), and the Correctional and Institutional fields in the student’s demographics folder are blank, the student counts as 'In Correctional Facility.'
  • When a student’s primary program is Corrections (Option Code 500), and 'No' is selected in the Correctional field in the student’s demographics folder, the student counts as 'In Correctional Facility.'
  • When a student’s primary program is Corrections (Option Code 500) AND ‘ Yes – Community’ is selected in the Correctional field in the demographics folder, the student will count as ‘In Community Correctional Programs.’
  • When any other choice except ‘No’ or ‘Yes - Community’ is selected in a student’s demographic folder, AND the field Institutional is ‘yes’ in the student’s demographic folder AND the primary program is not Corrections, the student will count as ‘In Correctional Facility.'
  • When ‘Yes – Community’ is selected in the Correctional field in the demographic folder, AND the field Institutional is ‘yes’ in the student’s demographic folder AND the primary program is not Corrections, the student will count as ‘In Community Correctional Programs.'
  • When a student’s primary program is Corrections (Option Code 500) AND the field Institutional is ‘yes’ in the student’s demographic folder, the student will count as ‘In Correctional Facilities.’
  • When ONLY ‘In Other Institutional Setting’ is selected and Corrections is NOT the primary program, the student will count as ‘In Other Institutional Settings.’

Freeze and Roll over


Data Freeze - this is the date that the ability to create new FY Records is removed from all agencies in the state.  The date of the data freeze is selected by the state office.  Since the FY Records are the 'snapshot' of the data that is used to populate the NRS Reports, any data entered for the previous fiscal year after the data freeze will not be reflected on the NRS Reports.  So, for example, if NM decides to do the Data Freeze on August 16th, 2013, this means that any 12/13 data agencies enter after this date will not be reflected on the NRS Reports because they can no longer create FY Records to capture the data for the Tables.  (the only way new FY Records can be created after the data freeze is if the state office requests that we create new FY Records for students, and I will come back to that point in a moment)

 

Rollover - during the rollover, we update the hours and assessment information so it now reflects the new fiscal year - in this case 13/14 and we add the ability for agencies to create 13/14 FY Records.  The date of the Rollover is also selected by the State Office.  

 

Most states schedule the rollover a week or two after the data freeze so they have one final chance to review their data prior to the rollover.  If, during this review time, you find anything that needs to be corrected, you can ask the agency to make the necessary data correction and then you can submit a tech support request for LiteracyPro to update the 12/13 FY Record.  We would just need to know which students in which agency need to have the FY Record updated.  

 
Some states schedule the Data Freeze and Rollover to take place on the same weekend.  The states that do this have already reviewed the data prior to the weekend of the Data Freeze/Rollover to be sure everything looks good because once the Rollover takes place we no longer create new FY Records for 12/13.  The only updates to the 12/13 FY Record that can take place after the Rollover is if a student who left in 12/13 received his GED after the Rollover - in those cases we will do a limited update of the FY Record that only affects the GED information in the FY Record, not any of the other info in it.

There is not a parallel database; the only change that takes place during the rollover is that the information in the existing database is updated to 13/14 instead of 12/13.  And, there is not a time that agencies cannot enter data.  In the time between the data freeze and rollover, agencies can enter 13/14 data, but there are some states that encourage agencies not to enter data during the time between the data freeze and rollover.  The states that request that agencies not enter data during this time do so just in case there is a need to have new FY Records created during this time and they don't want agencies making multiple changes in the data that could affect the FY Records.  Typically, this is not an issue, especially since the data freeze and rollover process have been improved upon over the last several years